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How are major incidents identified

It is imperative that processes are in place that ensure a major incident is identified. Typical alert and identification scenarios include: The Service Desk notices a large volume of similar incidents that seem connected to a single issue End users contact the Service Desk or use a self-service portal to notify the Service Desk of a critical service outage Event monitoring alerts business-critical services that there is a failure or potential failure  Technical Resolving Groups identify a major incident or potential major incident during routine maintenance work.

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3 ways you are damaging your career as a Major Incident Manager

A career in Major Incident Management is exciting and can be high profile. You engage with nearly all of the Operational staff at different stages, with your communications reaching the entire End User community, including C-suite Executives. Whilst the role can be thrilling, it is also easy to let a few bad habits seriously impact on your credibility and career. Here are 3 common mistakes to keep a check on and avoid:   1 . Don’t think win/lose, think win/win It can be difficult to strike the right balance; your primary objective is to restore normal service operations as quickly as possible, and often that means being assertive. However being too dominant with Technical Staff might get you the result...

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Charlie Munger’s 10 rules for success are highly relevant for Major Incident Managers

We watched a video recently with Charlie Munger (Vice Chairman of Berkshire Hathaway, controlled by Warren Buffet). Charlie Munger is an extremely successful and respected man. In this video Charlie talks about his 10 rules of success, it struck us that the Major Incident Management community would benefit from his wisdom. A shortened version of his 10 rules are: Always keep learning Deserve what you want (i.e. work hard to earn trust and respect) Know the edge of your own competency Be a survivor Practice the right approach Understand what you are doing Invest in trust Know all of the big ideas Swim as competently as you can (accept that you will fail sometimes, we all do) Don’t submerge into self-pity...

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3 lessons Major Incident managers can learn from Navy Seals

Navy Seals are the elite. Their training is extremely tough both physically and mentally. Here are 3 lessons Major Incident Managers can learn from Navy Seals: 1 – Set milestone goals Breaking down a goal into manageable milestones makes an overall big goal clearer, less complex and more manageable. This kind of detailed planning requires discipline, but it makes positive outcomes far more likely. Seals are excellent at planning and achieving big goals that are often complex with many variables. 2 – Visualise success to overcome failure  As you would expect, Seal training is tough. Throughout the training 75% of people who make it on to the initial 6-month training end up washing out. Seals understand their objective, and they...

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The 3 Phases of a Major Incident

Note: The Best Practice in IT Major Incident Management and it’s components are a framework and your organisation’s other existing processes should be considered when incorporating Major Incident Management into Operations. Whilst the primary objective of Major Incident Management is to restore normal service to End Users, there are three phases that have sub objectives that contribute to the primary objective. The three phases of the Best Practice Major Incident management Process: The initial 15 minutes (of major incident identification) The post 15 minutes (n.b. this can last hours or sometimes days) The resolution (and closure of the major incident) The initial 15 minutes phase In the initial 15 minutes of major incident identification the key objectives are: Validation (that there...

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